Industry headlines


6th - 12th October 2014


October 10, 2014

EE poised to launch own TV set-top box

EE, the mobile operator, is to launch its own set-top box that offers TV and video streaming packages. The service will be in direct competition with YouView, which is run by a consortium that includes BT, TalkTalk the distribution company Arqiva, the BBC, ITV, Channel 4 and Channel 5. EE has previously participated in discussions to join the YouView consortium but no deal materialised and the company is now set to launch its own service. The service will be free to EE broadband customers. It is anticipated EE will offer Freeview broadcast channels and a number of paid-for video-on-demand channels via the internet. It is thought programming from the BBC, ITV and Channel 5 will be on offer but not from BSkyB, which has its own set-top box product with Now TV.

October 10, 2014

Kantar launches official Twitter TV Ratings in the UK

Kantar Media has unveiled the UK's official Twitter metric for measuring Twitter TV audience engagement. Kantar Media developed Twitter TV Ratings as part of a global partnership, announced last year, with the social network. The tools will be available from mid-October. The ratings tool has been designed to harness geofiltered UK Twitter data that will enable broadcasters, media agencies and advertisers to track how Twitter amplifies the power of television. It will include metrics not seen in the UK before, including unique authors (people tweeting) and their affinity to brands, channels and programmes, and unique audience. Using data only available to Kantar Media, the ratings will be able to measure the number of individuals who viewed tweets related to individual programmes, as well as impressions (the total number of times that a tweet or retweet has been seen about a particular programme). The tool will also incorporate the more familiar, existing metrics, such as the number of tweets and retweets about a programme before, during and after transmission; average tweets per minute and the highest volume of tweets per minute ascribed to the programme in question.

October 10, 2014

Ofcom green-lights London Live's request to cut local TV content

Last month, Ofcom refused a request from Evgeny Lebedev’s ESTV Ltd – the provider London Live – to make changes to its programming that were deemed to have substantially altered the character of the channel – making it considerably less local. Following this decision, ESTV Ltd submitted a request to Ofcom in September for a smaller change to its programming commitments to reduce the hours of repeats shown by the station. The local TV channel proposed reducing its local programming repeats from 10 to six hours a day, and from an hour and a half to zero in peaktime (6pm-10.30pm). This request was significantly more limited in scope than its previous application.


October 10, 2014

Ebuzzing rebrands to Teads following merger

The Ebuzzing & Teads group is changing its name to Teads, marking a new phase of growth for the business. Video advertising technology company Ebuzzing teamed up with Teads in March. Teads is a video advertising supply side platform (SSP) that allows publishers to sell their advertising inventory by auction. Teads works with publishers around the world including Slate, Newsweek, Le Figaro, Corriere della Sera, The Moscow Times, China Daily, Times of India and Nikkei. The rebrand is intended to mark a new phase of growth for the business, which currently employs more than 300 people across 25 offices worldwide and is expected to have revenues of US $100 million (£62 million) in 2014, up more than 50 per cent from 2013. Meanwhile, Christophe Parcot, the former Yahoo Europe director, is joining the company as its chief operating officer. Parcot joined Yahoo in 2006 and has served in a variety of senior commercial roles.

October 10, 2014

British music fans have streamed twice as many songs in 2014

10.2bn tracks have been played on Spotify and its rivals in the UK so far this year says industry body BPI Some musicians may be sceptical about the merits of streaming music services like Spotify, but their popularity is growing among British music fans, according to new figures published by music industry body the BPI. It claims that the number of tracks streamed in the UK has nearly doubled year-on-year: 10.2bn in the first nine months of 2014 compared to 5.4bn at the same stage in 2013. Streaming services like Spotify, Deezer, Napster and Rdio are now streaming 300m tracks a week in the UK, added the BPI, which is also trumpeting the popularity of British artists on these services elsewhere in the world. It cites figures released by Spotify today claiming that 19% of all songs listened to on its service globally are the work of British artists, with Coldplay, One Direction, Ed Sheeran, Calvin Harris and Mumford & Sons proving particularly popular.

October 10, 2014

UK viewers ‘spend five hours a week watching TV, clips and films online’

TV shows are the top form of online content with average viewer watching two hours and 35 minutes a week, says IAB report Tech-savvy Brits spent an average of more than five hours a week watching TV shows, clips and films on internet-connected devices in the first half of 2014 largely due to the popularity of tablets and smartphones. TV programmes proved to be the most popular form of online content viewed by UK users, at an average of two hours and 35 minutes a week, according to a report from the Internet Advertising Bureau. Films were watched an average of one hour 50 minutes a week, and video clip views averaged 51 minutes. “A third of online viewers, particularly 35- to 44-year-olds, are watching more TV, films and clips online than a year ago,” said the IAB’s chief strategy officer, Tim Elkington. “Average weekly viewing online amounts to 25 videos, four to five TV episodes and one film.” Londoners averaged the most time watching online TV (three hours six minutes) and films (two hours 27 minutes), possibly because of the amount of time many commuters spend on public transport with their smartphones and tablets.


October 10, 2014

Trinity Mirror ditches Nasa, admitting 'we'd run out of space jokes'

Trinity Mirror ditches Nasa, admitting 'we'd run out of space jokes' Trinity Mirror has dropped its National Advertising Sales Agency (Nasa) branding for its national and regional sales in favour of Trinity Mirror Solutions, as part of a wider restructure. Nasa was only created by the publisher of the Daily Mirror, Liverpool Echo and Manchester Evening News last March, led by then sales leader, David Emin. However, announcing the rebrand today, James Wildman, chief revenue officer at Trinity Mirror, told Campaign: "The name Nasa hadn’t really resonated, and frankly we had run out of space jokes. We’d rather our unified commercial division does what it says on the tin, and Trinity Mirror Solutions does that." Trinity Mirror Solutions, or TMS, will realign the advertising team with the Trinity Mirror brand, and is said to follow feedback from customers. A new structure – including three further new senior roles – is also being introduced, designed to allow the team to better combine the potential of TMS’ brands and audiences for the benefit of advertisers.


October 10, 2014

Morley stakes claim as outdoor's ambassador

Morley stakes claim as outdoor's ambassador By exploiting OOH's digital potential, Andrew Morley aims to boost Clear Channel and the wider sector. This summer’s appointment of Andrew Morley as the chief executive of Clear Channel appears to confirm that out-of-home is moving ever closer to the mobile sector. Morley, who made a name for himself as the vice-president of marketing at Motorola for seven years, has spent the past three working for Google. His arrival at Clear Channel’s Golden Square came just weeks after Telefónica’s Shaun Gregory took the helm at Exterion across town in Camden. Neither has worked in outdoor before, but both wax lyrical about the digital opportunities they see unfolding. Of the £1 billion advertising revenues generated by the sector last year, 25 per cent are now related to new digital sites. "When I look at the media landscape, I see outdoor as having huge opportunities," Morley says. "There’s some macro-social dynamics – people are spending more time outdoors. And, in terms of consumer habits, you can see how people indoors might use mobile alongside TV; outdoors, the natural connection with mobile is with outdoor advertising." Clear Channel has announced plans to add 75,000 QR codes to sites in areas that feature heavy footfall and long dwell-times in an initiative called Connect.


October 10, 2014

BBC iPlayer extends to 30-day service

BBC iPlayer extends to 30-day service The extended service is said to be a response to a "huge demand to make programmes available for longer," according to Ralph Rivera, director of future media at the BBC. He said the number of people searching for programmes after the seven day catch up window has increased. BBC One hit Happy Valley, for example, reported 154,000 searches in the three weeks after it became unavailable on BBC iPlayer. Rivera said: "Whether it’s on the bus on their mobile – or on their tablet in bed at night, I’m really pleased that we’re able to give our audiences longer to watch and listen than ever before." In addition, speech and music programmes from across the BBC’s portfolio of national radio stations (such as BBC Radio 4 and BBC Radio 2) and BBC radio stations in Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland are now available to stream for 30 days on BBC iPlayer Radio.

October 10, 2014

BBC iPlayer extends to 30-day service

BBC iPlayer extends to 30-day service The extended service is said to be a response to a "huge demand to make programmes available for longer," according to Ralph Rivera, director of future media at the BBC. He said the number of people searching for programmes after the seven day catch up window has increased. BBC One hit Happy Valley, for example, reported 154,000 searches in the three weeks after it became unavailable on BBC iPlayer. Rivera said: "Whether it’s on the bus on their mobile – or on their tablet in bed at night, I’m really pleased that we’re able to give our audiences longer to watch and listen than ever before." In addition, speech and music programmes from across the BBC’s portfolio of national radio stations (such as BBC Radio 4 and BBC Radio 2) and BBC radio stations in Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland are now available to stream for 30 days on BBC iPlayer Radio.

October 10, 2014

BBC iPlayer extends to 30-day service

BBC iPlayer extends to 30-day service The extended service is said to be a response to a "huge demand to make programmes available for longer," according to Ralph Rivera, director of future media at the BBC. He said the number of people searching for programmes after the seven day catch up window has increased. BBC One hit Happy Valley, for example, reported 154,000 searches in the three weeks after it became unavailable on BBC iPlayer. Rivera said: "Whether it’s on the bus on their mobile – or on their tablet in bed at night, I’m really pleased that we’re able to give our audiences longer to watch and listen than ever before." In addition, speech and music programmes from across the BBC’s portfolio of national radio stations (such as BBC Radio 4 and BBC Radio 2) and BBC radio stations in Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland are now available to stream for 30 days on BBC iPlayer Radio.